Learn the terms, know the game

When reading about miles, points, and flying higher, you might come across some unclear, confusing, or just plain strange terms. Consult this subsection to learn the vocabulary associated with the trade. Vocabulary is arranged alphabetically, and if you want something specific, you can search for it by using your web browser’s search function (Ctrl+F on PC, Cmd+F on Mac).

Alliance A collection of airlines that pool resources together in order to save costs, increase the size of route networks, and share profits from connecting passengers.

Avgeek Short for “Aviation Geek,” an avgeek is someone who is passionate about aviation.

Closed Jaw For a travel reservation to be considered “closed jaw,” the traveler must have a single departure point, a single arrival point, and then return to the original departure point. See below for a visualization. Compare with “Open Jaw.”

Closed Jaw
A closed jaw route between New York and Los Angeles. Map courtesy of gcmap.com.

F Class An abbreviation for an airplane seat in First Class. Compare with “J Class” and “Y Class.”

Fixed Point Currency Reward points that are tied to a specific value. The most common point-to-cash ratio is: 1mile = 1cent.

Flexible Point Currency Reward points that can be transferred to companies other than the issuing one. The value of the points change upon transfer, thus making their values variable (i.e. flexible).

Hard Product The physical aspect of an airline’s offerings on board. Includes seats and restrooms. Compare with “Soft Product.”

Hotel Family A collection of hotel chains that are managed by an overarching parent company. Members pool resources together in order to save costs and retain guests.

J Class An abbreviation for an airplane seat in Business Class. Compare with “F Class” and “Y Class.”

Legacy Carrier An airline that has long been established in a particular country or region. Fares usually range on the more expensive end, but often include privileges not found on low cost carriers.

Low Cost Carrier (LCC) An airline that offers cheap air fares, but no frills. It is not uncommon for fees to be tacked on to a base air fare, such as for checked baggage and meals.

Minimum Connection Time (MCT) The mandated amount of time that airlines must allow for connecting passengers to transfer between flights at an airport. It’s highly variable depending on conditions, but passengers on domestic flights have a shorter amount of time than do those on international flights.

One Way (O/W) A travel reservation with only an outbound leg scheduled; there is no return leg booked on that ticket.

Open Jaw For a travel reservation to be considered “open jaw,” the traveler must have a single departure point, a single arrival point, but then return to a place other than the original departure point. See below for a visualization of this. Compare with “Closed Jaw.”

open jaw map
A open jaw between New York and Los Angeles and Miami. On one ticket, the traveler would depart New York for Los Angeles, but return to Miami. Map courtesy of gcmap.com.

 

Reward Points A secondary currency offered by banks, hotels, and airlines (among other companies) that are designed to incentivize continued patronage from customers. Frequent flyer miles are a type of reward points.

Round Trip (R/T) A travel reservation with both an outbound leg and a return leg booked on a single ticket.

Seat Pitch The distance between seats on an airplane. Seat pitch is generally used to measure legroom.

Soft Product The service aspect of an airline’s offerings on board. Includes meals and flight attendants. Compare with “Hard Product.”

TATL Short for “Trans-Atlantic.” Generally refers to flights that connect North America with Europe.

TL;DR Short for “Too long; didn’t read.” Usually signifies a single sentence that summarizes a larger body of text.

Y Class An abbreviation for an airplane seat in Economy Class. Compare with “F Class” and “J Class.”

3-4-3 A (sample) numerical representation of how many total seats there are in any given airplane row, as well as how they are clustered. The numbers represent how many seats there are in a cluster, and the hyphens represent aisles. In this example, there are 3 seats grouped together, an aisle, 4 seats in the middle section, another aisle, then 3 seats on the far side of the plane. Other common combinations are: 3-3-3, 2-4-2, 2-3-2, 1-2-1, 3-3, 2-2.

5/24 Rule A Chase policy that dictates that those who have applied for more than five credit cards in the past 24 months will be denied automatically for most of its cards

*A Short for “Star Alliance”

…and more terms are constantly being added. Contact me if you want to request an entry.